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Sound Quakes -

Unusual Booms,

Sounds

Mysterious Boom Rattles Fannin County January 2, 2018 , by Natalie Kissel  BLUE RIDGE, Ga. – Residents of Fannin and Gilmer counties took to social media late Friday night trying to find the source of what is being described as a loud explosion. The boom that took place had enough force that some residents were reporting their homes shaking from the blast. Residents took to social media to try to find the source of the noise. Brenda Curry, a resident of Cherry Log, described what happened close to midnight on Dec. 29: “At first, I heard (and felt) one big explosion. I looked outside, because it sounded like a transformer had blown, or what I imagined a propane tank might sound like if it exploded.” “I didn’t see anything,” Curry stated of looking outside directly after the noise,”no fire, flames, or smoke.” The unexplained noises did not stop there. “Then I heard another boom. A minute later there was another one. Then there were about seven ‘booms’,” Curry added, “A few minutes later about five more.” Residents in a large area of both Fannin and Gilmer counties described similar events. Reports came in via Facebook of having felt or heard the explosion in downtown Blue Ridge, near Fannin Regional Hospital on Hwy. 5, Morganton, and Cherry Log. Gilmer County Public Safety, as well as the Fannin County Emergency Management Agency, had no reports of any incidents that would explain the source of the noise that was causing a stir on social media. The boom was heard in Blue Ridge, Morganton, and Cherry Log. Fannin and Gilmer counties can now be added to the list of areas that have experienced similar events in previous weeks. Counties across northeast Georgia have reported booms so loud that homes have been shaken following the blast. Reports have been filed in Jackson, Hall, Habersham and Madison counties. All reports are similar in description, and no source has been fund as to the cause of these booms. North Georgia is not the only area affected by these unexplained happenings. Reports of mysterious booms have come in from across the Southeast all week, which has led many to speculate on the origins. One popular theory is the use of tannerite by local gun enthusiasts. Tannerite is the brand name of a patented exploding target used in the practice of firearms. When used for target practice, tannerite can create an explosion similar to a stick of dynamite. “Realistically, a tannerite explosion can be set off that can be heard for 20 to 15 miles, but the volume you’d be setting off would cause so much localized noise that within a mile of where it was set off would be numerous reports to the police,” Chad Johnson, owner of Rock Ridge Training, a firearms training service provider in Blue Ridge, explained of the effects of tannerite. Residents offered possible explanations of the mystery boom. Johnson went on to say, “If you had a noise that propagated that large, at the fringes it would be nowhere near as loud as the center (localized explosion), but these people are reporting the same relative volume at the fringes – all the way across. So to me that says something is more generalized than localized.” Believing that tannerite is a good first thought as to a possible explanation of the boom, Johnson says that the science behind tannerite does not fit the scenario that has taken place. Others in Fannin and Gilmer counties speculated that the cause could have come from military training. Residents are used to military planes running aviation training missions over our mountains, but sonic booms are rare in our area. “If the military or commercial aviation are flying over populated areas, they are prohibited to break the sound barrier because of sonic booms,” Johnson discussed the possibility of a military cause, “partially because of the annoyance, but secondarily because of the damage to homes that can occur.” “There are rare times when the military is permitted to do it, when they must for some training activity,” Johnson stated. While it is possible for the military to have granted permission for such training, Johnson felt that it was unlikely due to the time of night. The North American Craton is a layer of the North American plate, and has an edge that runs directly through North Georgia. Lastly, some posed the possibility of an earthquake, and cited the 2.7 magnitude earthquake that took place in Robbinsville, North Carolina, Tuesday, Dec. 26. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) website, which tracks earthquakes worldwide, no activity was reported in north Georgia or surrounding areas on the night of Dec. 29. The USGS website does have a page dedicated to unexplained sounds. The website states, “Earthquake ‘booms’ have been reported for a long time, and they tend to occur more in the Northeastern US and along the East Coast.” It goes on to say, “No one knows for sure, but scientists speculate that these ‘booms’ are probably small shallow earthquakes that are too small to be recorded, but large enough to be felt by people nearby.” No one can say with certainty the cause of what residents experienced in our area, but booms, such as the one that took place in Fannin and Gilmer counties, have been reported throughout our country for years and are likely to continue for some time without explanation.   Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com What was that "boom" people heard in Great Falls? Posted: Apr 01, 2018 3:14 PM Updated: Apr 02, 2018 12:36 AM EDT Although the source of the loud boom that was felt and heard in and around Great Falls on Saturday afternoon has not yet been determined, we do know that is was not the result of an accidental detonation of a nuclear missile from Malmstrom Air Force Base. Hundreds of people reported hearing the loud boom in all areas of Great Falls and even beyond; there has been speculation that it may have been a military jet breaking the sound barrier, a small earthquake, a meth lab explosion, or possibly even a "frost quake" (see below). While those are all possible, we are confident in stating that the boom was not caused by a nuclear missile. Someone used a website that lets people create their own "news articles" for humorous purposes in order to make a bogus article claiming that the boom was caused by an accidental detonation. The article is riddled with typos, poor grammar, and false statements, such as that Air Force personnel "...can be seen walking 56th St, 38th St, and 24th St with Geiger Counters, checking for radiation levels." The bogus article concludes: "Be advised that it may be beneficial to secure your home and to be keen to the signs of radiation poisoning: nausea, confusion, rashes, violent outbursts, diarrhea, red hair, hang nails, etc." The "fake news" website contains a disclaimer that states: "All people, locations, and events on this site are completely made up. We believe the world needs to lighten up and have more humor. That's why we have a site devoted to satire and humor. This is all made up. Sit back, relax, and enjoy something funny that is not true... it's made up. We made up the names, locations, actions... everything. We made it all up. We also added our opinion." Despite that, some people have contacted KRTV asking if the bogus article is true. The answer is no. We have asked the Great Falls Police Department about any incidents that may have caused the boom; they said they have not received any reports of such. ________________________________________ (1st Report, 3:14 p.m.) Just after 2:45 p.m. on Sunday, KRTV began receiving numerous reports from people who heard a loud boom. Some people said that they felt a small jolt at the same time. Andrew Haney: "Did anyone hear that explosion sound in river view?" Heather Friede Myre: "Felt it on the SE side as well." Tiffany Tesfay: "We just heard it on 38th st and 8th ave south" Derek Falkenhagen: "Heard it on gore hill" Christina Nichter: "Felt a jolt near Lewis and Clark elementary." Chelsey Pearce: "Heard and felt it in castle pines" Laura Mann-Feist: "Heard and felt something down town." Nicole Gilcher: "What was that boom a few minutes ago?" Darin Rindal: "I heard something as well" Keith Voyles: "Me also. I heard a smaller boom followed by a louder one. Maybe that satellite entering the atmosphere." Tawny Miller: "We heard/ mildly felt it over central gf too!" Stephanie Schmitt: "What was the boom sound about 3pm?" We have checked the U.S. Geological Survey website, and there have not been any earthquakes reported in the area. Some people have speculated that the boom could be related to the imminent crash of the Chinese Space Station Tiangong-1, which is due to re-enter Earth's atmosphere within the next 12 hours -- but as of 3 p.m. on Sunday, the space debris has not crashed into the earth, according to Space.com. Current models predict that it will land in the southern hemisphere. One remote possibility is that the boom may have been related to a cryoseismic event. The website FrostQuake.org explains: “Frost quakes,” also known as cryoseisms, are a natural phenomenon that occurs when extremely cold temperatures lead to sudden deep freezing of the ground, after it has been saturated with water. The Vermont Geological Survey defines a cryoseism as, “[a] major frost cracking of the top few feet of the ground, occurring during sub-zero cold snaps, which generates localized ground shaking and is often mistaken for an earthquake.” Expansion that results during the process of freezing can lead to the buildup of explosive stress, which may result in fractures within the earth. Although the possibility is small, conditions favorable for a "frostquake" have been present in Montana over the last 48 hours. We are checking our sources to determine the likelihood. ust after 2:45 p.m. on Sunday, KRTV began receiving numerous reports from people who heard a loud boom. Some people said that they felt a small jolt at the same time. Andrew Haney: "Did anyone hear that explosion sound in river view?" Heather Friede Myre: "Felt it on the SE side as well." Tiffany Tesfay: "We just heard it on 38th st and 8th ave south" Derek Falkenhagen: "Heard it on gore hill" Christina Nichter: "Felt a jolt near Lewis and Clark elementary." Chelsey Pearce: "Heard and felt it in castle pines" Laura Mann-Feist: "Heard and felt something down town." Nicole Gilcher: "What was that boom a few minutes ago?" Darin Rindal: "I heard something as well" Keith Voyles: "Me also. I heard a smaller boom followed by a louder one. Maybe that satellite entering the atmosphere." Tawny Miller: "We heard/ mildly felt it over central gf too!" Stephanie Schmitt: "What was the boom sound about 3pm?" We have checked the U.S. Geological Survey website, and there have not been any earthquakes reported in the area. Some people have speculated that the boom could be related to the imminent crash of the Chinese Space Station Tiangong-1, which is due to re-enter Earth's atmosphere within the next 12 hours -- but as of 3 p.m. on Sunday, the space debris has not crashed into the earth, according to Space.com. Current models predict that it will land in the southern hemisphere. One remote possibility is that the boom may have been related to a cryoseismic event. The website FrostQuake.org explains: “Frost quakes,” also known as cryoseisms, are a natural phenomenon that occurs when extremely cold temperatures lead to sudden deep freezing of the ground, after it has been saturated with water. The Vermont Geological Survey defines a cryoseism as, “[a] major frost cracking of the top few feet of the ground, occurring during sub-zero cold snaps, which generates localized ground shaking and is often mistaken for an earthquake.” Expansion that results during the process of freezing can lead to the buildup of explosive stress, which may result in fractures within the earth. Although the possibility is small, conditions favorable for a "frostquake" have been present in Montana over the last 48 hours. We are checking our sources to determine the likelihood. Upper Bucks residents complain of mystery explosions Authorities are working to determine the cause By Julia Rose Posted: Apr 22, 2018 06:23 PM EDT Updated: Apr 22, 2018 09:37 PM EDT RICHLAND TOWNSHIP, Pa. - Mysterious explosions in upper Bucks County are leaving residents confused and frustrated. People in areas like Quakertown and Coopersburg say they're being woken up by loud booms and some even say the blasts shake their homes. "It is quite loud," says Donna Weaver of Quakertown. Weaver is one of many who hear loud booms in the middle of the night. "It went boom, boom, that's what it sounds like to me and that sounds like an explosion," said Weaver. Residents said the booms consistently sound off around 2:00 a.m. and there are typically two rounds, five minutes apart. "It's just a boom, it almost sounds like we would live right next to a quarry," said Quakertown resident Cindy Warden. Neighbors are calling it a mystery and so are police. The Richland Township Police Department say it's received a lot of calls about the explosions. The department posted a message on Facebook that says in part, "Rest assured, we are not aware of anyone having permission to blast, and hope to help in locating the source of these explosions. If anyone sees anything suspicious in that area, please reach out to Police or the township." "Nobody can figure out what it is," said Weaver. As Richland and Milford Township authorities work to investigate the issue, the theories behind the booms are swirling on social media. "Some people were saying maybe they think it's kids throwing M-80's or cherry bombs, others are saying aliens," said Weaver. People in Springfield Township also say they hear the booms. ‘It’s like a bomb goes off’: What is causing mysterious loud booms in Girard? POSTED 6:26 PM, APRIL 25, 2018, BY JACK SHEA GIRARD, Ohio -- There are some jangled nerves in the City of Girard in Trumbull County as a series of mysterious loud booms are rattling residents and their homes. Some residents believe the booms are caused by gas explosions at a near car shredding company; however, others believe the booms are the result of underground explosions. "It's like a bomb, like a bomb goes off and the vibration of your house, it's crazy and it's very scary," said Mary Lou Hughes, Girard resident. Some residents say the explosions are so powerful they've actually caused cracks in the foundations of their homes. Residents have taken their concerns to city hall. Mayor Jim Melfi says they have been unable to identify the source of the explosion but theories include a build-up of gas from an old landfill or an underground disturbance caused by a now closed waste water injection once used in the fracking industry.
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